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Nutrition Labels

Nutrition Labels

Are you a nutrition label master?

Are you a nutrition label master?

Nutrition facts are labelled on all packaged food, from cereal and bread to cookies and candy. How well do you know the nutrition label? Where do you find information that matters to you? What do these things mean?

Take the Quiz
QUESTION 1 OF
What should you check first when evaluating a nutrition label?
 
 
Great work! You got it right.
The correct answer is: B
The serving information should be the first place you look to find out both the size and number of servings in the package. If a serving is one cookie, but there are two cookies in the package and you eat both of them, then you’ll need to double everything that’s on the label.
SOURCE: FDA
QUESTION 2 OF
What is the FDA-recommended daily intake of Vitamin C?
 
 
Great work! You got it right.
The correct answer is: B
The FDA-recommended adult daily intake of Vitamin C, also known as L-ascorbic acid, is 60 mg. The nutrition facts label tells you how much of that daily intake is provided by this food.
Source: NIH
QUESTION 3 OF
What do calories measure?
 
 
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The correct answer is: A
Calories provide a measure of how much energy you get from a serving of this food. Many Americans take in more calories than they need without meeting the recommended nutritional intake. This is an important part of the label when it comes to managing your weight.
SOURCE: FDA
QUESTION 4 OF
What serving measurement might you see on the nutrition facts label?
 
 
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The correct answer is: D
You can expect to see a variety of serving measurements that are familiar to you, such as cups, tablespoons, pieces and slices. These are accompanied by their metric equivalent (grams, etc.).
SOURCE: FDA
QUESTION 5 OF
What’s another word for dietary fiber?
 
 
Great work! You got it right.
The correct answer is: C
Dietary fiber is a type of carbohydrate found in plant foods that are sometimes referred to as “roughage.” Dietary fiber is bound in such a way that it cannot be readily digested by the small intestine, helping to promote regularity and to interfere with the absorption of dietary fat and cholesterol. It also has been shown to help people feel more full after meals.
SOURCE: FDA
QUESTION 6 OF
What would a 15% daily value of sodium mean?
 
 
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The correct answer is: A
Look at the Percent Daily Value to know how much one serving of this food contributes to the total amount of this nutrient you need—or the maximum you should have—per day. When you’re talking about limits, a food that is only 5% of the limit should be fine. A food that is 30% of the limit can be a problem depending on what else you plan to eat, or have eaten, that day.
SOURCE: FDA
QUESTION 7 OF
Why isn’t there a Percent Daily Value for trans fat?
 
 
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The correct answer is: C
The Food and Drug Administration hasn’t set a Percent Daily Value for trans fat because experts recommend that Americans avoid food with trans fat and partially hydrogenated oils. Trans fat has been linked with raising a person's LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and lowering “good” cholesterol, both of which increase the risk for heart disease.
SOURCE: Mayo Clinic
QUESTION 8 OF
If a food contains 20% of your Percent Daily Value for calcium, how much more calcium can you have that day?
 
 
Great work! You got it right.
The correct answer is: B
The Percent Daily Values listed for “good” nutrients, such as vitamin C, iron and calcium, are suggestions for the recommended minimum amount of these minerals you should consume each day. If you want to get more calcium, that’s great (within reason of course). In fact, it is recommended that adolescents and post-menopausal women get more calcium than the daily 1,000 mg goal.
SOURCE: Mayo Clinic